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by Matthew Herper Forbes, August 21, 2014 Illumina ILMN -0.02%, the leading maker of DNA sequencing equipment, is partnering with Sanofi , AstraZeneca , and Johnson & Johnson JNJ -0.38% to create a test for more mutations in dozens of genes that will be used first in clinical trials and, eventually, to help decide which patient should get which marketed drug.

Category: genetics
Tags : cancer, sequencing

Ice Bucket Impact Long-Term

Posted: Aug 23, 2014
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Healthcare digital fundraising had a huge win this month through the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge. But is the effort a real success over the long haul?


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IDC's recently released report, Creating Business Value from Mobile-First Development Practices, shows proven business returns at companies investing in mobile. But only 16 percent have an enterprise-led mobile strategy. Mobility presents a new set of challenges for organizations. It also, however, presents a key opportunity to drive business transformation and benefits, including increased sales, better brand awareness, competitive advantage and decreased costs.


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Today the average American’s health insurance payments fluctuate once a year. Imagine if that rate changed each day, determined in part by a sensor-rich gadget on the wrist. Sound far-fetched? That could be our startling future as the next generations of devices like the Fitbit or Jawbone Up play a bigger role in how individual-and-group health insurance costs are decided, tech developers and experts in the healthcare space have told Forbes. It’s all thanks to the growth of real-time, detailed data they’re generating about our bodies.


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Apple has announced what many considered an “about face” from prior practice. The first product worthy of examination in the Apple 180 is the heavily rumored “iWatch,” which most analysts have pegged for a launch around October 2014. It's nearly certain to work invisibly in tandem with the iPhone. If you have an app on the phone that tracks activity, it should transparently use whatever data it can. Apple likely also will open the platform to third-party apps. OUR TAKE: Apple's product will be the best available thus far, but leads to the usual temporary digital divide: the haves will have access to enhanced digital and wearable health tools, and the have-not-as-much majority will have a lesser degree of options and features on their wearables. The plus is that it pushes Samsung and the rest to add more wearable intuitive and meaningful use features, and to keep improving. -JS


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Tablets aren't merely novel and fun. With guidance from creative teachers, they are helping to deepen engagement, communication, and creativity. For a growing number of special education students tablets and their apps are proving transformative. On the surface, the PS 177 Technology Band looks like a typical high school orchestra. But there are two big differences. First, while they use traditional instruments, they also play iPads. And all of the band members have disabilities. Some have autism spectrum disorders.


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If you have young children, you’ve most likely endured caring for an ear infection or two. Or perhaps you’ve experienced a mysterious rash. Those situations generally mean a trip to the doctor’s office and time away from your job, if you work outside the home. But what if you could snap a photo of your rash, or your child’s ear canal, and send it to your doctor? The New York Times takes a look at a new breed of apps and devices that increasingly put medical tools in the hands of consumers.


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Intel's take on wearable tech uses biometric data and a downloadable app -- an appealing idea for consumers who don't want to buy a new phone or other gadget.

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